David Hevel

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Biography

DAVID HEVEL

Born: 1971, Kirksville, MO

Education:

2002 California College of Arts and Crafts, San Francisco, CA
MFA, Film/Video Performance
1998 M.Ed., Curriculum and Instruction University of Missouri, Columbia, MO
1993 Central Missouri State University, Warrensburg, MO
BFA, Commercial Illustration and Studio Painting

Selected Solo Exhibitions:

2010 "David Hevel: Glamidermist,” Galerie Olivier Houg, Lyon, France
2009 "Beautiful, Dirty, Dirty, Rich," Marx & Zavattero, San Francisco, CA
"This Sugar is Raw," SF Recycling & Disposal, San Francisco, CA
“How Deep is Your Love,” Marx & Zavattero, PULSE New York, New York, NY
2008 “MORE: The Cautionary Tale of Britney Spears,” Schroeder Romero, New York, NY
2007 “Babes in the Woods,” Richard E. Peeler Art Center at DePauw University, Greencastle, IN
"Diva Hound Smack Down at the Grammys," Byron Cohen Gallery, Kansas City, MO
2006 “Fierce,” Heather Marx Gallery, San Francisco, CA

Selected Group Exhibitions:

2013 "The Art of Recology: The Artist in Residence Program 1990-2013," SFO Museum, Terminal 3,
San Francisco, CA
2011 “Sea Change: The 10th Anniversary Exhibition,” Marx & Zavattero, San Francisco, CA
2009 “I Want You To Want Me,” Marx & Zavattero, San Francisco, CA
"Natural Blunders,” The de Saisset Museum, Santa Clara, CA
“Oh, Maybe…,” OFF-Space, Emeryville, CA
2008 “Tales of Wonder and Woe: Fable and Fairy Tale in Contemporary Art,” Castle Gallery, New Rochelle, NY
“Bestiaries,” Oakland Art Gallery, Oakland, CA
“What Are You Laughing At?” ArtCenter/South Florida, Miami, FL (curated by Nina Johnson)
2006 “Fantasy Island 2,” Drake Hotel, Toronto, ON
2005 “Beautiful Debris,” Heather Marx Gallery, San Francisco, CA (traveling to Cypress College Fine Arts Gallery, Cypress, CA)
“Material Matters,” The Lab, San Francisco, CA
“Nancy Boy,” Richmond Art Center, Richmond, CA (traveling to Truman State University,
Kirksville, MO)
2004 “Build: An eight-hour Performance Event,” The Works Gallery, San Jose, CA
2003 “SanFranBananas,” Whitney Cultural Center, San Francisco, CA
“Queer Art,” San Francisco LGBT Center, San Francisco, CA
“Fresh: Redefining Queer Aesthetics,” San Francisco LGBT Center, San Francisco, CA
“Boutique,” Blackbird Space, San Francisco, CA
“Fictional Science,” HereArt, New York, NY
“Poplular TM,” The Works Gallery, San Jose, CA
2002 “Repurpose,” Southern Exposure Gallery, San Francisco, CA
“Punked,” Monart Gallery, Walnut Creek, CA
“Extravaganza,” Paulette Long and Shepard Pollack Gallery, San Francisco, CA
“1111,” California College of Arts and Crafts, MFA Graduate Exhibition, San Francisco, CA
“Fuel,” Paulette Long and Shepard Pollack Gallery, CCAC, San Francisco, CA
“Warrior Games,” Paulette Long and Shepard Pollack Gallery, San Francisco, CA
“Re-enactment of Voyage to the New World,” Artist Event, Oakland, CA
2001 “Voyage to the New World: 1st Fabulous Party after 9/11,” Artist Event, Oakland, CA
“Murphy-Cadogan Scholarship Award Exhibit,” San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery, San Francisco, CA
“Museum of Future Atrocities,” ATA, San Francisco, CA
“CCAC Video and Writers Showcase,” CCAC, San Francisco, CA
“BioRave: Biotech Benefit for the Coalition of Artist and Other Life Forms,” ATA, San Francisco, CA
1997 “FiberWorks,” Legacy Gallery, Columbia, MO
“Graduate Exhibit,” Bingham Gallery, Columbia, MO
“Fiber In/Forms,” Mabee Atrium Gallery, Culver-Stockton College, Canton, MO
1996 “Curator of Graduates in Fibers,”Brady Gallery, University of Missouri,
Columbia, MO
“Kimonos and More,” Legacy Gallery, Columbia, MO
1995 “Best of Show: The Mid-Missouri Computer Animation Festival,” University of Missouri,
Columbia, MO
1992 “Works on Paper,” Milwaukee Art Institute, Milwaukee, WI
“Kansas City Regional Coalition of Higher Education Art Exhibition,”
Kansas City, MO

Awards and Residencies:

2009 San Francisco Dump Artist In Residence Program, SF Recycling & Disposal,
San Francisco, CA
2007 Artadia Award, San Francisco Bay Area

Selected Bibliography:

2011 Feinstein, Lea, "'Sea Change: Part One' at Marx & Zavattero," ARTnews, December, p. 113
Swanhuyser, Hiya, "Ten Years, Part Deux," SF Weekly (Night & Day section), July 13, p. 17
2009 Morris, Barbara, “David Hevel: Marx & Zavattero,” artillery, November/December, p. 50, 52
Nataraj, Nirmala, “Beautiful, Dirty, Dirty Rich,” San Francisco Chronicle (96 Hours section), September 10
Swanhuyser, Hiya, “Shiny Unhappy People,” SF Weekly, September 9
Stark, Marianna, “Hevel, David: Rhinos and Monkeys and Unicorns, Oh My!” thestarkguide.com, September 7
Flajole, Patrick, “Art provokes thought on man vs. nature,” The Santa Clara, January 22
2008 Asper, Colleen, “David Hevel,” Beautiful/Decay, Issue Y, p. 42-47
Koppman, Debra, “Natural Blunders” (Preview), Artweek, Dec. 2008/Jan. 2009, p. 25
De Jesus, Carlos Suarez, “Art with Laughs: A new Lincoln Road show delivers the sting of comedy,” Miami New Times, May 1
de Wavrin, Isabelle, “Art Basel Miami Beach: 36 heures chrono sur les traces d’un collectionneur,” Beaux Arts Magazine, February, p. 112-115
2007 Rooney, Julie, “Sex, drugs and rock ‘n’ roll: the art of David Hevel comes to DePauw, animalizes celebs,” The DePauw, November 2
Schubert, Alex, “Dog Gone Art is House-Trained, but it’s No Pop Star’s Best Friend/The Art Bizarre,” Kansas City Star, January 4, p. A1, E1, Preview 1, 28-29
Fischer, Annie, “Hot and Hevel,” The Pitch Kansas City, January 4
2006 Morris, Barbara, “David Hevel at Heather Marx Gallery,” Artweek, November, p. 13
Martin, Stacy, “Fierce,” SF Bay Guardian, October 11, p. 67
Janku, Laura Richard, “Fair Report: Affair @ the Jupiter,” artinfo.com, October 1
Farr, Kristin, “David Hevel: Fierce,” KQED Arts & Culture Online, September 15
Johnson, Ken, “Other Art Fairs Hitch A Ride on Armory’s Buzz,” The New York Times, March 10, p. E41
Cash, Stephanie, “Report from San Francisco II: New and Now,” Art in America, January, p. 60, 62
2005 Berry, Colin, “ 'Material Matters' at The LAB,” Artweek, September, p. 14
Helfand, Glen, “Critic's Picks: Beautiful Debris,” artforum.com, August
Bing, Alison, “Good and Trashy,” SFGate.com Art ePick, July 28-August 3
Nataraj, Nirmala, “ 'Nancy Boy' at the Richmond Art Center,” Artweek, May,
p. 15
Taylor, Robert, “What the Peeps is going on? Examples of 'New Pop Art' are all over the Bay Area,” Contra Costa Times, February 6
Print print

Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

DAVID HEVEL: BEAUTIFUL, DIRTY, DIRTY, RICH
September 10 – October 17, 2009

Opening Reception for the Artist: Thursday, September 10, beginning at 7:00 PM

For more information, contact Steve Zavattero
Phone: 415.627.9111/e-mail: info@marxzav.com
Website: www.marxzav.com

Marx & Zavattero present David Hevel’s second gallery solo exhibition Beautiful, Dirty, Dirty, Rich. Creating a funky boutique vibe, Hevel will display his new sculptures amongst gaudy pink Styrofoam columns, pink and white stenciled wall decor, and an array of mirrored pedestals and gold leaf frames. The effect will be a Victorian boudoir of sorts, in which his new series of porcelain monkeys clad in handmade couture, and wall-mounted and floor taxidermy sculptures take center stage. Known for mining the closets of art history – 18th and 19th C. porcelain, religious, and secular Old Master paintings – and all matter of kitsch, floral, and decorative arts, this show promises to be a devilish romp.

Similar to hip-hop artists sampling previously created music or splicing together clips of video, David Hevel’s sculptures synthesize disparate artifacts from our lives to create a fresh, open-ended narrative. Hevel’s work is satire and critiques not only the detritus produced by the media industry, but the consumers of these products as well. Hoping to reveal the absurdity of American consumerism, global economy, and the chaos of mass media, Hevel juxtaposes mid-American aesthetics of taxidermy and floral arrangement with the gossip, glamour and glitz of Hollywood royalty.

Featured will be a menacing and ribald “portrait” of Bernie Madoff as a life sized four-foot long, black gloss rhino head, bedazzled with rhinestones and dog collar. The forever fated Michael Jackson and Farrah Fawcett are depicted as two wall-mounted “trophy” unicorns nuzzling together, and another duet of sorts will be the pairing of the large-scale sculptures The Ascension of Saint Angelina and The Adoration of Brad Pitt. Angela Jolie is deified as a bejeweled baboon gazing towards the heavens atop a beaded pumpkin, swathed in heavenly butterflies, while the adoring chimpanzee of Pitt supplicates her with outstretched arms. Here, Hevel turns to religious metaphor to highlight the irony of Jolie and Pitt’s newfound sainthood status in the media.

Also on view will be a series of small porcelain monkeys outfitted in Spring, Summer, Fall, and Winter hand-designed couture collections inspired by contemporary designers Alexander McQueen, Dior, and Jean Paul Gautier. Referencing 18th and 19th Victorian and German porcelain, Hevel’s menagerie of self styled monkey “supermodels” pay homage to his youth where he grew up surrounded by his family’s collection of decorative porcelain figurines and animals.

The layering of themes in Hevel’s work mirrors the layering of materials used to build his sculptures. His constructions draw readily from floral design and combine a myriad of faux flowers, glass beads, tassels, costume jewels, taxidermy forms, and offbeat craft products that are painstakingly pieced together. Hevel’s use of such synthetic materials suggests the hyper-artificiality of the subject matter itself. His work shifts seamlessly between the grotesque and the beautiful, suggesting influences as far ranging as artist Jeff Koons, homemaker Martha Stewart, and the Baroque and Rococo decorative arts.

Hevel’s work has recently been featured in several group exhibitions including Tales of Wonder and Woe: Fable and Fairy Tale in Contemporary Art, Castle Gallery, New Rochelle, NY; What Are You Laughing At?, ArtCenter/South Florida, Miami, FL; and Natural Blunders, deSaisset Museum, Santa Clara, CA, among many others. Solo exhibitions include Schroeder Romero, New York, NY; PULSE New York; The Peeler Art Center at DePauw University, Greencastle, IN; Byron Cohen Gallery, Kansas City, MO; and the upcoming This Sugar is Raw at San Francisco Recycling & Disposal. Hevel received his MFA from the California College of Arts and Crafts (now CCA), San Francisco, in 2002 and was a recipient of an Artadia Award in 2007, as well as a Murphy & Cadogan Fellowship Award from the San Francisco Foundation in 2001. His work has been written about in The New York Times, Art in America, artforum.com, SF Weekly, Beautiful Decay, Artweek, Miami New Times, Kansas City Star, KQED.org, and SFGate.com, among other publications. Hevel is currently an artist-in-residence at the San Francisco Recycling & Disposal and lives in Oakland, CA.

 

Nicolas Bourriaud discusses a contemporary art practice, coined “postproduction”, as artists who reproduce, re-purpose, or re-mix available cultural products in a process referred to as ‘cultural recycling’. Similar to hip-hop artists sampling previously created music or splicing together clips of video, postproduction is the act of synthesizing disparate artifacts from our lives to create a fresh, open-ended narrative. Hoping to reveal the absurdity of American consumerism, global economy and the chaos of mass media, my work juxtaposes mid-American aesthetics of taxidermy and floral arrangement with the gossip, glamour and glitz of Hollywood royalty.

We are flooded with this detritus providing us with a convenient distraction from important issues of life. Growing up in rural, mid-America where television is a dominant force, has led pop culture to be a central characteristic of my work. Pop culture transcends race, class, politics and geography. Everyone knows of Britney Spears. Equally decadent and artificial are taxidermy and faux flowers. I see these artifacts as preserving heroism freezing a moment of manhood. It’s a kind of bragging right of one’s command over nature.

Although the work is not intended to be hypercritical of celebrity lives, I do hope to create a space for humorous dialogue about the subject. In bringing these sculptures to life, I hope to take a snapshot of a moment in time addressing the complexity of the American experience in an entertaining fashion.

So often contemporary art is inaccessible to a general audience and the art world upholds an esoteric dialogue over one understood by the masses. I hope to make artwork whose subject is common enough to invite everyone. Celebrities are just the protagonist for such a goal.

  • For inquiries, please email Heather Marx Art Advisory at H[at]HMxAA[dot]com